Throughout the centuries, mothers have played an important role not only in the raising and rearing of children but also in the function they play as peacemakers within the home and the community. As far back as the Civil War there are recorded examples of women from the North and the South putting aside their difference to gather together to heal the wounds of the divided nation. Mothers from both sides understood well the important role women play in raising the children of a nation and their unifying role as mothers.

Often this kind of work is done quietly with little recognition of the efforts, but in the early 1900s, a West Virginia woman named Anna Jarvis, campaigned to bring mothers the recognition she felt they deserved. Believing that too many calendar holidays focused on the recognition of men, Jarvis created an initiative to recognize mom. Jarvis called mothers “the person who has done more for you than anyone in the world.”

Following the passing of her mother, Jarvis delivered carnations to the church where her mother had taught Sunday school for the last 20 years. She asked that carnations be provided to each mother in the congregation for Mother’s Day. Carnations were chosen by Jarvis because they were one of her mother’s favorite flowers. By 1907, Jarvis’ efforts to recognize the impact of mothers began in her home state of West Virginia before being nationally recognized as an holiday in 1914 by President Woodrow Wilson who decreed it as an official celebration the second Sunday of every May.

Traditional Token of Love

Jarvis’s tradition of giving carnations for Mother’s day soon came to honor all mothers. White carnations were worn by individuals whose mother was no longer living and red and pink carnations were worn to honor those with mothers who were still living. Today the tradition continues to be an important part of Mother’s Day celebrations each May, expanding to also recognize the important contributions of mothers whether they are grandmothers, moms, aunts or daughters.

One of the most popular declarations of love for mom on Mother’s Day is jewelry. Depending on her individual tastes, that piece could be a heart-shaped pendant, birthstone ring or necklace, engraved ring or locket, or a charm. Birthstones are a classic way to commemorate the birthdate of a child or celebrate the gift of grandchildren.

Gemstone Birthstone List

Garnet: January – (Jan. 21 – Feb. 18)

Amethyst: February – (Feb. 19-March 20)

Aquamarine: March – (March 21-April 20)

Diamond: April – (April 21-May 21)

Emerald: May – (May 22-June 21)

Pearl, Moonstone: – Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Ruby: July – (July 23-Aug. 23)

Peridot: August – (Aug. 24-Sept. 22)

Sapphire: September – (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)

Opal, Tourmaline: October – (Oct. 23-Nov. 22)

Yellow Topaz, Citrine: November – (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)

Turquoise, Tanzanite: December – (Dec. 22-Jan 20)

This Mother’s Day remember the special women in your life with carnations and a memorable birthstone piece. Noe’s Jewelry offers a beautiful range of gemstone pendant necklaces, gemstone bracelets, rings and earrings set in sterling silver and 14K yellow or white gold.

Check out our selection of lovely Mother’s Day jewelry online at Noe’s Jewelry or visit us in person at our store in Raytown, Missouri.